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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 449 (some duplicates have been removed)
on these foreign policy issues. leon is literary editor since 1983 and the author of nuclear war, nuclear peace against identity. i might mention that tonight is the relaunch of the new republic. it is really a new era and everyone is excited about that. we will be leaving to go to the new republic party. this is how it is going to go. we will start with 10 minutes from each team. leon will talk about why the u.s. should do more in the syria. that we will hear from josh and aaron on why the u.s. should not go any further. then the leon and bob will rebut their argument. i will begin a discussion by grilling the one or both of the teams on their arguments. the other side will have a chance to respond. each team will have three minutes to answer questions. their answers strike -- somebody could come and uniform and escort you out. let's get to it with bob k. again and leon on why the u.s. should be doing more in syria. >> thank you. thank you senator john mccain who is a national hero for the work he has been doing in the senate all of these years. i just use up some of my time, but it is worth i
interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford foundation, and pricewaterhousecoopers llp. >> coming up next, the intervention calculation. (instrumental music) >> historically the u.s. leaned heavily on strategic interventions to help counter the influence of communism. >> the reagan doctrine was a notion that we would support those that sought to oppose soviet domination. >> during the cold war there was a polarized world - there was the soviet union, there was the united states and a lot of our interventions were used to block the advance of communism, and so very ideological basis for our, our inte
on whether she has left america's foreign policy in stronger or weaker position. most think the future lies with china than the u.s. it's not all mrs. clinton's fault. but the fact is we just don't have the influence we used to have around the world from syria to mali, we have led from behind, so in effect the former secretary of state has helped manage our decline in what looks increasingly like a post american world. and that's the memo. now on to the top story. another view on this, joining us now from new york, fox news contributor julie ragenski and former advisor to frank lautenberg and president rosenberg a center left think tank and campaign advisor to president clinton. all right, simon, tell me, where did i go wrong there on judging mrs. clinton? highly intelligent, global celebrity. >> yep. >> incredible run from first lady to senator to secretary. why was this a great tenure as secretary of state? >> first of all agrow agree with the negative characterization. i think we are safer today in the world than when barack obama took office. i think there have within two central legaci
what we call economic statecraft to be a central pillar of our foreign policy you had to talk outomen and girls and so i've tried to do that. >> restrictions on women's economic participation are costing us massive amounts of economic growth and income in every region of the world. >> this work, ensuring that women are equal partners, as they should be, and are free to realize their own god-given potential, was one of the great pieces of unfinished business of the 21st century. with this equal futures partnership, we are taking an important step toward trying to finish that business. through this initiative, governments from around the world are making concrete commitments to support women in two key areas -- political participation and economic opportunity. >> have you gotten any guarantee from the president that that will be -- your work will continue under secretary kerry? >> yes. and under the president, i think the president has made very clear that this is a priority for the obama administration. senator kerry did some very gd work as a member and chair of the senate foreign rel
and girls, the rights and roles of women and girls a central focus of american foreign policy. and i didn't do it because it was a nice thing to do or it was some pet project of mine. i did it because the evidence is overwhelming. countries that deny political and social rights to women and girls are more unstable, more likely to breed extremism, more likely to threaten the united states. countries that deny economic opportunities to women and girls, rooted in education and business and investment are not going to be as prosperous as they might otherwise be. so it became clear that if i was going to be traveling around talking about diplomacy and development, urging changes in economic structures, introducing what we call economic statecraft to be a central pillar of our foreign policy you had to talk about women and girls and so i've tried to do that. >> restrictions on women's economic participation are costing us massive amounts of economic growth and income in every region of the world. >> this work, ensuring that women are equal partners, as they should be, and are free to realize th
or gently lead the witness back to approved foreign policy bromides and away tr dangerous taboos. >> your commitment that i ran should not under any circumstances have had ability to have a nuclear weapon. and i appreciate that position very much. >> and i appreciate your taking the time to meet with me. we had an extensive discussion and your understanding of the complex challenges we face in the middle east and the importance of our alliance with israel. >> i would like for you as the committee is getting to know you, know something about your service in vietnam and your combat experience. were you wounded, senator hagel? >> finally, there was the nominee himself, who appeared to have prepared for the hearing by skimming a few briefing talking points on his cab right to the capital and who rather than defending some of hits comments on foreign policy, the importance of exhausting every chance of peace rather than leaping into the horrors of war, the dysfunctional congressional politics of israel/palestine, he seemed resign to glumly recant. >> name one person, in your opinion, who is in
the speech given last night by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam. if it's carried out, i will resist it. in march 2008 you said, quote, here the term "quagmire" could apply. >> what are these? the full bright hearings? i lived through them? this is kind of like a 1970s movie where you go back into the past where it never even happened. why is he fighting with him about vietnam. >> it's interesting. he's fighting with him over iraq but it seems to be vietnam. he seems to be mad that hagel took issue with him about iraq and compared it to vietnam being the big blunder, which, of course, hagel and mccain both served in. when mccain talks about iraq, he only wants to talk about it from the surge on. it's as if everything before that didn't happen and didn't count and we ask still debate whether it worked or not but the big decision is whether it was as big as vietnam. and he didn't want to have that argument. >> he dug into his ankle here and he wouldn't let go. let's listen again. back again to the old war. >> were you co
about athletics when in actuality they need to be making decisions about foreign policy and how we get people back to work in this country. i think we need to focus on that instead of trying to prosecute barry bonds for lying about taking steroids. that is not the biggest issue in the world. the biggest issue is starving kids on the street. thank you for your time. i would like to give a shout out to bobba bouy. host: on the trail of a senatorial scandal. two stores related to senator menendez. prostitutes fill its streets. next to that with a picture who denies any wrongdoing, women named by the tipsters exist, but not anymore. it points out the shadowy tipster that made the allegation involving bob menendez and underage prostitutes and the dominican republican gave names. despite the details, the women are nowhere to be found. inside "the washington post," giving him the worst week in washington. from oklahoma, good morning. caller: i do not mean to be rude about this. but with all of the regulations going on, it is kind of silly. how far do you go with it. it is getting silly. how f
to be devoted to? devoted to economics or foreign policy, iraq and iran, what ever it should be. at cbs we made a deal about never giving you the questions or categories, because you are supposed to keep that distance. >> do you feel any sense of discomfort at having to participate in what you did this time. >> this is the first time i have that this way and this was new, and basically -- janet called me and said, this time we want to divide this up into six categories, and i said, fine. you did not have to say in what order were anything but i think -- you really don't need to in today's sophisticated world. >> but you did. and this hadn't happened before so why was the change. >> with the commission said to me was that they were keen on two things. and the commission is running this. the three of us and candy are not rolling this. >> by your jim lehrer. >> -- you are jim lehrer. >> this is how they ask and here is how the imitation goes to the debate. and if under these rules, would you do this certain fang -- i found out what they propose and made the decision, i would do that and here is wh
him the most important person in the mix this week in the vice president spoke about foreign policy challenges at the munish security conference. >> we have made it clear at the outset that we would not-- we would be prepared to me bilaterally with the irani leadership. we would not make it a secret that we were doing that. we would let our partners know if that occasion presented itself. that offer stands. nearly all of our partners and allies are convinced that president assad is a tyrant, hell-bent on clinging to power, is no longer fit to lead the syrian people and he must go. >> as well as syria and iran the united states faces new challenges from islammix extremism in african, yet it is not clear they are ready to stand on their own by 2014 when u.s. troops are scheduled to withdraw. and great power politics are on the a lend-- agenda again. china is confident, insertive in the south china sea in relations about moskow have cooled. all of this with a troubled economy at home and calls for a lighter footprint abroad. i'm pleased to have tom donilon back at this table. welcome.
it to marriages or affairs, but the fact that they'd been side by side on a lot of foreign policy stuff 10 and 20 years ago and then had a break over the war in iraq and then chuck hagel didn't support john mccain when he was running for president. gwen: he did the first time but not the second time. >> right, when he was actually a candidate. gwen: the actual nominee. >> and then finally the fact that john mccain believes very deeply in his own positions and wanted to prove himself right and hagel wrong and thought he had him on the surge. all of that. >> so it was great theater. as gwen said, hagel got beaten up. is he going to get confirmed? >> yes. and it is bizarre in a that she knows probably the worst confirmation hearing performance that any of us can remember of any nominee -- certainly for a cabinet position. supreme court nominations are a little different. and it all comes down to there are 55 democrats. none of those democrats have said they will vote against him. ok. one republican, thad cochran of mississippi has said he will vote for hagel. that makes him the unluckiest republican
or incorrect when you say it -- when you said that the search would be the most dangerous foreign-policy disaster sense the non? the question is right or wrong. i would like the answer of whether you are right or wrong and then you are free to elaborate. >> i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer. >> let the record show that you refused to answer the question. >> if you would like me to explain, -- >> i actually would like an answer. >> what else did we learn from today's hearing a short time ago? he did not do the best job of defending himself. >> no, it was a fractious hearing and pointless. he referred to the government of iran as legitimately elected. he apologized for saying that israel had arranged a slaughter of its enemies. he was defending his views on iran. on israel, they think he is not friendly enough. in the end, i don't think we learned a lot about him, really. in the past, he had expressed traditionally dovish liberal foreign policy positions even though he used to be a republican. he was moving back from those same more of what the republican senators wanted to hear
on the grill with regard to foreign policy. they know what those people stand for. it is striking that the questions were softball. it was a love fest. i don't have any question about that. i will say this. news management in washington is do for everybody. i think back with mike with president reagan and the idea that they are not going to get answers to certain questions, with politicians, that is what they want. >> jon: we know you served as press spokesman, would 60 minutes have done that kind of interview with any of your bosses? >> no way. here is the missed opportunity. when you have the president of united states and secretary of state you have to corner them. you have to ask them about iran and negotiations and syria and what we're doing or not doing. why aren't we helping france in mali. the white house wouldn't be able to say, state department would give you more details or the state department will say that policy decision has to be made by the white house. that is the reason why political reporters shouldn't be reporting on foreign policy. >> jon: then the interview w
correct or incorrect when you said the search would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? correct or incorrect? yes or no? are you going tonswer the queson, nator hage the question is, were you right or wrong? i would like to answer whether you were right or wrong. and you are fe to elaborate. >> i am not going to give you a yes or no answer -- >> let the record show that you refuse to answer the question. >> he finally gave the answer he wanted to give. >> i saw the suffering and consequences of a war. i did second think the srch. would this bwortthe crife? we lost almost 1200 dead americans during that period was it required, necessary? >> how much of that exchange was political, how much was personal, and how much was related to our defense policy, mark? >> 92, 11, 13. [laughter] a lot of it was personal. one could not watch those hearings without feeling that there were a lot of personal grudges, even vendett, being settled. >> entered john cornyn of texas says it cannot support the nominee for defense secretary, says we need to be toughe
that they agree with far more than men do with senator kerrey on foreign policy, and they just trashed him. >> does he have the know-how to manage a barrel at the pentagon? >> he was unsteady with his answers, grasp of the facts. later in the afternoon, the third round of hearings, after he was more sure-footed, does he have the capacity to do it? i think so. if you listen to his exchanges with senator king from maine, managing the defense department, it was a much more competent answer. >> what about this jewish lobby phrase? he apologized for using that phrase, but listen to this exchange. >> name one person who is intimidated by the israeli lobby in the u.s. senate. >> the use of intimidation -- i should have used influence. >> he could not name one person publicly. this is gamesmanship of the first order. you have conversations with plenty of members of congress and they feel one way about some of the issues in the middle east, that they simply cannot move an inch on issues involving israel. >> is he in command of the issues? >> i do not think anybody would have come off well. i think
and its impact on neighboring countries. then, a look at foreign policy challenges facing the obama administration. after that, a discussion about the state of women's rights around the world. >> if you have some hotshot who just got his phd in computer science from stanford, she is getting offers from all over the world. to say you can stay in some limbo for six years, that is not really competitive. >> congress can do a lot. you do not have to be efficient on your iphone or blackberry to understand the application of policy and what makes it work and does not. >> it is very difficult to make investment decisions and expect any kind of return on investment when you have no way to predict the future. our difficulty right now is that there is no consistency or certainty in in our policy decisions. >> the government's role in technology and policy, from this years ces international consumer electronics show. monday night on the communicators on c-span2. >> at age 65, she was the oldest first lady when her husband became president. she never set foot in washington. her husband, benjami
. it has played a role in moving people to see some of the backroom dealings of u.s. foreign policy. it has exposed people to think harder. i do think it played a role in leading people in tunisia and egypt to look at some of the cables and see what people already knew in their gut the soccer field in wikileaks about the alliances between u.s. foreign policy with the most repressive elements in those countries. let's hope that changes as the uprisings continue. anytime you can learn more about what is being done in our name, it is critical. that is part of what transparency is about. the freedom of information act is still not working well under the obama administration. some of that is pos/t 9/11. in los war will lead to a decline in information transparency access. anytime you can have less sequence -- secrecy, that is good. less secrecy is needed. it was handled at the outset by partnering with newspapers like "the guardian," traditional newspapers of distinction. wikileaks released documents around the world to newspapers in india, haiti, the middle east, latin america. it has had an im
the shuffle going on in the president's cabinet. today, the focus is on the foreign policy team. tahman bradley is watching the ever-changing lineup and joins us from washington with more. hi, tahman. >> reporter: hey, rob and sunny. clinton is out, kerry is in. and chuck hagel, a republican, who you would think would be a bipartisan pick is under furnd. john kerry takes over today. will hillary clinton run for president. >> i don't know how else to say it but i'm going get back into my life again. this is going to be new for me. i don't know how i'm going to react to it, to be honest. >> reporter: senator kerry takes over. president obama's choice to run the pentagon is a different story. former senator chuck hagel, a vietnam veteran, took heavy fire from his own party. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in the country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? >> i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things. >> you refuse to answer that question. >> reporter: he was hammered by gop senators
foreign policy blunder since vietnam? correct or incorrect? yes or no? are you going to answer the question? the question is, where you're right or wrong? that is a pretty straightforward question. i would like for you to answer whether you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> i am not going to give you a yes or no answer -- >> hagel finally gave the answer on the surge that he wanted to give. >> i saw the consequences and suffering and horror of war, so i did question a surge. will this be worth the sacrifice? we lost almost 1200 american during that period was it required, necessary? >> how much of that exchange was political, how much was personal, and how much was related to the defense policy? >> 92, 11, 13. a lot of it was personal. one could not watch those hearings without feeling there were a lot of personal grudges but, even vendettas, being settled. >> center cornyn of texas says he cannot support a nominee for defense secretary who thinks we should be tougher on israel and more lenient on iran. is that a fair characterization of chuck hagel? >
said that the surge would be "the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam"? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to the surge -- >> are you answering the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. >> well -- >> i would like the answer whether you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things. >> well, let the record show you refused to answer that question. now please go ahead. >> well, if you would like me to explain why -- >> i actually would like an answer. yes or no? >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that. >> senator mccain and a lot of republican washington is banking on the lesson learned from the iraq war, being that we should have started that war, we should have escalated that war, we should have kept that war going, and now ten years on our only regret about the iraq war should be that we're not still there. and the only thing w
. >> that's only if you think 80,000 people dead is not ugly. yes, sir. adding a mac >> foreign-policy and especially security systems. this is another area where congress really has a role to play. the administration is basically decided that mohamed morsi at egypt is the new mubarak. the guy in the seat we will now help. it's completely indifferent to what our aid program should look like and what the desired outcome and egypt should be. the only thing they appear to be interested in is the continuation of the israeli egyptian camp david accords, which are obviously of great interest, but not really the only thing they should animate us and we talk about the largest country in the middle east. when i thought we were delivering fighter jets to the egyptian military, i just asked myself, what message does this send? the rule should be not the foreign aid is bad and not that foreign aid is good and not that military assistance is good or bad, it is the u.s. taxpayer dollar used to further u.s. tax your interest and every time a new government comes into power, we should take that aid do
the foreign policy and the united states by a descanting the state of israel. to be totally honest with you, i am very disappointed. liz: one of neil's favorite and frequent guest and said he was grateful for every day of his life. >> diane 85 years old whenever by calls me i am ready. >> i never heard somebody talking much about dying. >> ion 85. honestly i am a very good health. i am enjoying my life. i have no complaints. >> that was a bombshell. >> but americanamerican s are afraid lou: good evening, everybody. the dow jones industrials tonight above 14,000 for the first time since october of 2007. it just 155 points from its all-time high. the s&p regaining the 1500 level, the labor department today reporting 157,000 jobs were created last month, almost 170,000 people, however, dropped out of the workforce, despite all of that. the national unemployment rate rose one-tenth of a percentage. it now stands at 7.9. eight and a half million people have dropped out of the work force since president obama took office. the developments overseas tonight. a suicide bomber attack. the u.s. embassy i
of unmitigated failure we can look upon. we have a mixed record in foreign-policy. we have successes and we have failures. finally, as obama being the great extricate towaror. we have a history to. herbert hoover was one, and for the first years of his presidency, fdr was one. >> thank you. [applause]rex aaron, why don't you respond to that, specifically the point that whatever the u.s. said that both bob and leon talked about, whatever the u.s. has been afraid of happening in syria is happening right now. continued deaths, increase friday july station -- increased radicalization. we should act to prevent hundred of thousands of deaths -- we are moving up to 100,000 deaths in the syria. as the president said in his recent argument, that the u.s. is not intervening because of interest or limitations. what about the moral imperative that the president acted on in libya? >> libya and syria provides fundamentally different examples. let's be clear. it is in the resume of the great power to behave. in hypocritical fashion. that is how great powers behave because they have the luxury of being able to
. how power and foreign policy, anyway is still in the white house and not -- >> a point made by the "new york times" this morning. particularly in the tv interviews, did you see any cabinet member getting that kind of treatment? >> certainly not. but do remember that the media, had their knives out for hillary back in 2008 when she was in the way of the other media darling, president obama. but now she's been sort of safely put, safely put at foggy bottom when i was leaving, we can now discuss her potential for president of the united states. >> setting up my question for dana milbank. calling her the most powerful women in american history. hillary clinton had testing relations with the press during 2008 campaign and going back to her days as first lady. when did this romance blossom? >> one thing that causes change and that is the number of 67%. that's her favorable rating and, you know, the media may be bias. i'm sure amy would say in favor of the liberals and the democrats, but the truth is, we're bias in favor of people who are successful and we follow the polls and if s
think the speech given last night by the president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam if it's carried out. he will resist it. in march of 2008 you said, quote here the term quagmire could apply. >> what are these, the fullbright hearings? i lived through them and this guy is going back into some last year at marion bad, weird 1970s movie, where you go back into a past that never happened. why is he fighting hagel over vietnam? >> it's interesting because he's ostensibly fighting with him over iraq. but it immediately becomes about vietnam. it's as how they're talking about. he seems to be mad that hagel took issue with him about iraq and compared it to vietnam being the big blunder which of course mccain and hagel both served in. when mccain talks about iraq, he only wants to talk about it from the surge on, it's as if everything before that didn't happen and didn't count. and we can still debate whether the surge worked or not. the bigger issue is whether iraq was as bad as vietnam and he doesn't want to have that argument. >> here he is,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 449 (some duplicates have been removed)

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